A Travellerspoint blog

The Jamestown National Park and Colonial National Parkway

1964 and 2005


View Summer, 9-11-2001 - and then the 2nd time down the ICW & 2005 Migrating by Mercedes & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

Sunday March 13th
I went in to see what they had for the free breakfast, and had some apple juice, a little cereal and a donut. The donuts are too sweet.

It is supposed to be cold and windy tomorrow so I decided we should go out to Jamestown today. In retrospect, it would have been better to do some other things today as many of the places I wanted to go were closed on Monday. Like I wanted to take a tour of the base, and the tour information wasn't up to date. So I didn't realize that there was no tour on Monday, and the tours are only at 1330. But I apparently shipped home my Mid-Atlantic guide and the AAA isn't open today so I can't get additional maps and a guide.
Shrimp boats as we leave Fort Story

Shrimp boats as we leave Fort Story


We went out to Jamestown along the Colonial Parkway. There actually two parks at Jamestown and they may be easily confused one with the other. When my children were small, we went first to the Jamestown Festival Park, which is a Virginia State Park.
Me and my mother pushing a stroller outside the Fort in 1964

Me and my mother pushing a stroller outside the Fort in 1964


This contains the full-sized replicas of the three ships that brought the colonists, the Susan Constant, Godspeed, and the Discovery, and also a replica Indian village and stockade. It is kind of a themed amusement park. My daughter made the mistake of coming here instead of going all the way to the National Park which is just beyond it. She also made the mistake of buying a ticket to Yorktown State Park instead of going to the National Park Yorktown Battlefield, which is free.

Right next door, at the National Park Service site is an archeology/preservation type site. Here is where you find the reconstructed Glasshouse, the Memorial Cross and the visitors center. The visitor's center was blown down in Hurricane Isabel, and had to be reconstructed for the 2007 Exposition.
Construction sign 2005

Construction sign 2005


The National Park is the actual archeological site of the original colony. It includes Old Towne (the original fort), New Towne and informational signs on a three or five mile drive around the island.

The National Park Service has built the 23-mile scenic motor road - the Colonial National Parkway. This Parkway links the Big Three colonial sites (Jamestown (The Start), Williamsburg and Yorktown (The End of the Revolutionary War)) and was meant to create the "colonial atmosphere" thought necessary for the visitor experience. It wasn't just a means to get from one place to another.
I would like a new highway as part of the new park, on a strip sufficiently wide to protect it by trees shutting out all conflicting modern development, this highway not to be a glaring modern pavement but as much as feasible giving the impression of an old-time road. - Louis Cramton, 1929
Practically speaking, to give you a 'colonial experience' from the car this means that there is minimal signage and NO lines on the road. You have to be able to drive on the road without the normal road markings to keep you in your lane.
The speed limits are moderate.
45 mph

45 mph


Railings are wood instead of metal.
Colonial National Historical Parkway

Colonial National Historical Parkway


Instead of tar or concrete, the road has a rough exposed aggregate surface.
Road near Jamestown with exposed aggregate

Road near Jamestown with exposed aggregate


All the crossings are on overpasses constructed of colonial type brick.
April 1963 - Colonial National Historical Parkway

April 1963 - Colonial National Historical Parkway


Picture taken at VA199 overpass in 2005

Picture taken at VA199 overpass in 2005


Minimal Signage

Minimal Signage


I did not get a picture of the sign, but cyclists are warned that the road has open joints. They look pretty deep, although the ones parallel to the road look to be mostly in the middle. Note that there is no cyclists path marked off.
Parkway showing center joint

Parkway showing center joint


The road is shielded by trees from modern buildings and traffic. There are various turnouts (scenic overlooks) along the Colonial Parkway which allow you to read the informational signs, and look at the scenery. It was difficult for me to get Bob to stop at these points. In fact we did not stop at any of them, although we took the Jamestown Loop automobile trail (5 miles) where he did drive the car up to the signs so I could photograph them
Place to stop and read the signs

Place to stop and read the signs

Road going onto a bridge - no bike path

Road going onto a bridge - no bike path


View from the car crossing a bridge approaching Jamestown

View from the car crossing a bridge approaching Jamestown


There's a marina off the parkway right there next to Jamestown.
Marina from the Colonial Parkway

Marina from the Colonial Parkway

Timeline -1607
May 13: 104 male settlers arrive at site they name James Cittie and establish the first permanent English settlement in the New World.
May 26: Paspahegh Indians attack the colonists, killing two and wounding ten.
1964 photo captioned by my mother as Remnant of the foundation of Old Townsite  (1622 1/4 population killed by Indians)

1964 photo captioned by my mother as Remnant of the foundation of Old Townsite (1622 1/4 population killed by Indians)


June 15: James Fort is completed. Old Towne refers to the area of the triangular Jamestown Fort. Today archeologist have found all three corners and all three walls of that fort. New palisade walls have been erected over the archeological evidence and you can stand inside the fort, possibly where, according to the settlers, Pocahontas did cartwheels in the center of the square.
September 10: The Council accuses Councilor George Kendall of causing discord, and he is placed under arrest on the Discovery. He is later executed.
September 12: The Council finds President Edward M. Wingfield guilty of libel and he is deposed; John Ratcliffe takes his place.
December 10: Capt. John Smith leads expedition up the Chickahominy in search of food and is captured.

Entrance booth

Entrance booth


Hurricane Isabel took out the Jamestown Visitor's Center and also felled over 10,000 trees, so the visitor's center was in trailers (in 2005) and they didn't have a movie to show. They were gearing up for the 400th anniversary in 2007, including building a new Visitor's Center. We got a stamp in the NPS passport and there were still some interesting exhibits and information to be gathered.
Diorama of the original buildings

Diorama of the original buildings

Map of the site

Map of the site


For instance, in New Orleans we were told what we thought was a somewhat bogus tale about pineapple being a symbol of hospitality (which I knew) but adding that when a guest had overstayed their welcome they were given a pineapple.
Pineapple information

Pineapple information


I thought pineapple would have been too expensive to give to a guest to speed him/her on his/her way, and kind of rude as well.
Map of the island drive

Map of the island drive


The Great Road was the first English highway in America and traces of this road still exist. Some of them, considered in the light of documentary references, have made it possible to reestablish the route of the "Greate Road" formerly connecting the island and the mainland. It ran along the river shore, then turned inland and passed behind the church (which is behind the photographer).
The Great Road

The Great Road


It continued over the swamp and cut across the isthmus near where you come onto the island today. Here, the roadway was 30 to 35 feet wide. It was repaired from time to time by smoothing out the ruts and adding a few inches of sand.
Sign about Streets in the City

Sign about Streets in the City


The "Greate Road" from the mainland branched into two parallel east west roads in Jamestown. "Back Street" took an inland route. "Front Street" of the "Highway close to the river" ran near the riverbank of the 1700s.
James River

James River


Houses were generally oriented to a road or to the ditches running alongside of the road.

We went out and looked at the foundations where the houses etc were. In Jamestown's New Town the visible foundations rest over the original foundation ruins which are buried twelve to eighteen inches below the ground. This protects the original foundations from acid rain. The self-guided walking tour is about one-half miles in length. If you choose to visit each of the numbered stops, it may take up to 45 minutes.
New Towne foundations by the river

New Towne foundations by the river


This sign says "A Great Find -This modest cottage yielded a premier artifact of Jamestown - a spoon dated 1675. Made by Joseph Copeland in Chuckatuck, Virginia, the pewter piece provided a time marker for other objects found with it. Brick floors were common in Jamestown. The single line of bricks cutting across the floor was a familiar drainage solution. The break in the paving of the floor was made in the 1700s when a drain heading to the river was dug through the abandoned foundation.

STOP 1: YEOMAN'S COTTAGE: There is an unusually large fireplace. Archaeologists have decided that this structure was probably an ordinary (tavern) constructed sometime between 1645-1662. This conclusion was based on the high concentrations of pipestems (over 2,000!) found at the site.
Area around the Yeoman's Cottage

Area around the Yeoman's Cottage


STOP 4 ROWHOUSES - The rowhouses are similar to today's townhouses. The cellar of each unit or dwelling contained a kitchen and storeroom. On the ground floor, a fireplace and chimney separated the front room from the smaller room behind.
Row Houses

Row Houses


This rowhouse may have been built following a Town Act in 1662 requiring that 20 X 40 foot brick houses be built at Jamestown. Wine bottles found among the artifacts also suggest that one of the units many have been used as a tavern at some time.
An Estate In Town

An Estate In Town


STOP 7: AMBLER HOUSE - The Ambler-Traves Plantation house is not the first to be built on this site. In the 1750s, any building that remained was leveled to build the Ambler Mansion.
Ambler House across the excavations

Ambler House across the excavations


Small structures called wings were connected to each side of the large central house by walkways. The house was erected to take advantage of breezes for cross-ventilation. The Ambler House burned during the Revolutionary War, again during the Civil War, and finally in March 1895.

Stop 8 DITCH - Ditches were used to channel water (in this case to keep the road bed drier), keep animals in or out of property and were used as property line markers. Generally the ditches became handy places for Jamestown residents to throw their trash and other disposables.
Road, ditch and monument

Road, ditch and monument


I took pictures of the Pocahontas statue.
Statue of Pocohuntas 2005

Statue of Pocohuntas 2005


Pocahontas was the favorite daughter of Powhatan

Pocahontas was the favorite daughter of Powhatan


The Pocahontas Statue is by the artist William Ordway Partridge.
Pocahuntas statue 1964

Pocahuntas statue 1964


Rediscovery (of the site of the original fort)

Rediscovery (of the site of the original fort)

3413458-Corner_of_fort_Jamestown.jpgSigns about the fort

Signs about the fort


Captain John Smith felt that she saved his life at least twice. His statue is here too crafted by William Couper in 1909. It is located at James Fort, and is oriented so that he is looking over James River
Captain John Smith

Captain John Smith

Captain John Smith statue 1964

Captain John Smith statue 1964


There are several crosses including a large wooden cross at James Fort erected by the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities in 1957 in memory of those early English Jamestown settlers.
4608609-Cross_in_the_churchyard_Jamestown.jpgMemorial crosses

Memorial crosses


Nothing unexpected there.

But there is also a monument that I didn't expect to the General Assembly of the Virginia Colony which met from July 30 to August 4, 1619 in Jamestown.
In honor of the General Assembly - Jamestown

In honor of the General Assembly - Jamestown


It says:

HERE
ON THE THIRTIETH DAY OF JULY A.D. 1619
SUMMONED BY SIR GEORGE YEARDLEY
GOVERNOR GENERAL OF VIRGINIA
UNDER AUTHORITY FROM THE LONDON COMPANY
Pursuant to the Charter Granted by King
James I, was convened in the church at
Jamestown
The first General Assembly of Virginia
This Assembly
Composed of the Governor, the Council
of State and two Burgesses elected by the
People from each of the eleven planta-
tions was the Beginning of Representative
Government in the Colonies of England and
Laid the Foundation of the Liberties of
America.

The monument on was erected in 1907 near the reconstructed church building. The assembly met in the third church building on the site, a wooden structure that stood until about 1639 when a brick church was built.

The Indians walked everywhere or used canoes on the river.
Indian walk in the woods

Indian walk in the woods


To the colonists, the James River wasn't just something that was a beautiful view or even a place to get food. According to the sign, it was a lifeline because ships from England brought seeds, cloth, food, and more settlers.
Sign about the river

Sign about the river


When we first visited in the 60s, we took a ride on the Jamestown Ferry (also known as the Jamestown-Scotland Ferry) which is an automobile ferry on the James River in Virginia, connecting Jamestown in James City County with Scotland Wharf in Surry County. It is part of State Route 31. We watched the ferry going back and forth across the James River.
Bob watching the ferry

Bob watching the ferry


The ferryboat Captain John Smith made the first automobile ferry crossing of the James River on February 26, 1925. To head for the "Colonial Triangle" (Jamestown, Colonial Williamsburg, and Yorktown) and the Colonial Parkway from the south by water with a ride aboard one of the FREE Jamestown Ferries would be my preferred way of travel, but I didn't think of it in time. And maybe Bob would not have agreed.
During the 15-minute ride across the river passengers can walk about the boat or go up to an enclosed viewing level with lavatory facilities. Northbound passengers usually see the Jamestown Island much as the first colonists may have approached it almost 400 years ago. Near the northern ferry landing, the replicas of Christopher Newport's three tiny ships, Susan Constant, Godspeed, and Discovery are docked at Virginia's Jamestown Settlement (which is in the State Park).
Ferry from the national park

Ferry from the national park


In 1907, Jamestown had the three hundred year anniversary of the founding of the colony. There was a huge Exposition. It was held from April 26 to December 1, 1907, at Sewell's Point on Hampton Roads, near Norfolk, Virginia which later became the Norfolk Naval Station. Many of the buildings such as these State buildings from the Exposition later served as housing for senior officers.
Old Postcard from August 1907

Old Postcard from August 1907

Other side of the postcard sent by my grandfather to my grandmother

Other side of the postcard sent by my grandfather to my grandmother


Teddy Roosevelt, Booker T. Washington, and Mark Twain made addresses at the Exposition. Twain came twice, both times by yacht from New York, and seems to have enjoyed himself.
Jamestown Tercentennial Monument

Jamestown Tercentennial Monument


This was when the Jamestown Tercentennial Monument was erected by the United States. This monument is 103 feet tall and it bears the following inscription:
Lastly and chiefly the way to prosper and achieve good success is to make yourselves all of one mind for the good of your country and your own, and to serve and fear God the giver of all goodness, for every plantation which our heavenly father hath not planted shall be rooted out.
Advice of London Council for Virginia to the Colony 1606
462291676155167-The_big_Terc..own_Island.jpgJamestown Tercentennial Monument 1964 and 2005

Jamestown Tercentennial Monument 1964 and 2005


Picture of the monument base

Picture of the monument base


Other inscriptions say

VIRGINIA COMPANY
OF LONDON
CHARTERED APRIL 10, 1606
FOUNDED
JAMESTOWN
AND SUSTAINED VIRGINIA
1607-1624

JAMESTOWN
THE FIRST PERMANENT
COLONY OF THE
ENGLISH PEOPLE
THE BIRTHPLACE OF
VIRGINIA
AND OF
THE UNITED STATES
MAY 13, 1607
Schoolkids at the base of the monument

Schoolkids at the base of the monument


REPRESENTATIVE
GOVERNMENT IN
AMERICA
BEGAN IN THE
FIRST HOUSE OF
BURGESSES
ASSEMBLED HERE
JULY 30, 1619

A lot of tours start at this monument because it is an easily visible landmark all over the park. There were a whole busload of school kids there (even on Sunday) - the bus was a big fancy Greyhound type one (not a school bus) from Maryland. Some of the group were climbing around on the monument.
Kids at the base of the monument

Kids at the base of the monument


White Mulberry Tree

White Mulberry Tree


Entrance/exit from the churchyard

Entrance/exit from the churchyard


In the Jamestown Church Cemetery, there are a number of graves. Since there was little natural stone for grave markers, they had to be imported, usually from England. Therefore, the people buried here after the 1680s were wealthy enough to afford the tombstones
Gravestones outside the church

Gravestones outside the church


Tombstone sign

Tombstone sign


Many of the stones have been destroyed by time, or have been stolen. There are only twenty-five remaining. Some of the ones still here are grave markers erected in 1901 when there were excavations that found the graves.
Additional names of those buried here

Additional names of those buried here

Side of the church from the graveyard 2005

Side of the church from the graveyard 2005


The church had a somewhat eventful life. The first meetings were held under an old 'saile' that served as an awning. The second church was also made of wood. Pocahontas and John Rolfe were married in the second church. It burned in January 1608.
Informational sign about the churches

Informational sign about the churches


The third church was wood built on a foundation of cobblestones one foot wide capped by a wall one brick thick. You can see these foundations under the glass on the floor of the present building.
Cobblestone foundations

Cobblestone foundations


The First Assembly was held in the third church (per the monument above). The fourth church was a brick church built around the third church. After it was finished the church tower was added. The tower is the only seventeenth-century building still standing at Jamestown.
My father in 1964 and I in 2005 both took photos of the "original" church tower.
6155179-1964_Jamestown_Island.jpg1964 - tower covered with ivy

1964 - tower covered with ivy


Church tower of the 4th church 2005 without ivy

Church tower of the 4th church 2005 without ivy


Inside of the tower arch

Inside of the tower arch


It is one of the oldest English-built structures in the United States. The fourth church burned during Bacon's Rebellion on September 19, 1676. The tower survived and a fifth church was built. That building fell into ruins by the 1790s when the bricks were salvaged and used to build the present graveyard wall.
Bricks were used to build this cemetery wall

Bricks were used to build this cemetery wall


The present Memorial Church building was built by the National Society, Colonial Dames of America just outside the foundations of the earlier churches. It was dedicated May 13, 1907.
Church from the grounds

Church from the grounds

Inside the church

Inside the church


In addition there are stones in the church foundation.
Stone in the Foundation viewed through glass

Stone in the Foundation viewed through glass


Originally some of the stones had brasses attached but those have been stolen. The Knight's Tomb is believed to be that of Sir George Yeardly who was Knighted by James I in 1618 and who called the first representative legislative assembly to meet in the New World.
Knight's tomb

Knight's tomb


There are also plaques on the church walls to such people as Capt. John Smith, Pocohauntis, William Claiborne, Thomas West, and Canco (and Indian youth)
Plaques in the church

Plaques in the church

Memorial tablets in the church

Memorial tablets in the church


Looking out from the church

Looking out from the church


Then we drove around the loop trail on Jamestown Island. his is a one-way drive for automobiles, of either three or five miles. If you want to do the shorter length, take the left at the second fork in the road. The road may also be used by pedestrians and bike riders.
Road around Jamestown Island

Road around Jamestown Island


Some of the informational signs include:
STOP 1
Homes to Last

Homes to Last


Brickmaking-- The plentiful supply of Virginia clay assisted the colonist at Jamestown in producing most of their own brick. Bricks were used for houses, wells, and walkways. Brick kilns, such as the one in the painting, have been excavated at Jamestown. Each produced bricks of a unique size and shape. Such differences can help date archaeological remains to the time a kiln was active. Jamestown Island is near where the first settlement in Virginia was made. Most of the island is now under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service in conjunction with the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities. Jamestown Island was chosen by the English to avoid the Spanish

The Virginia Company, who funded everything, sent a list of criteria to use when picking a spot for the settlement and Jamestown met most of them. Jamestown was surrounded by water on three sides (it was not fully an island yet) and was far inland; both meant it was easily defensible against possible Spanish attacks. The water was also deep enough that the English could tie their ships at the shoreline - good parking! The site was also not inhabited by the local Powhatan Indians.

But if you choose your place so far up as a bark of fifty tuns will float, then you may lay all your provisions ashore with ease, and the better receive the trade of all the countries about you in the land; and such a place you may perchance find a hundred miles from the river's mouth, and the further up the better. For if you sit down near the entrance, except it be in some island that is strong by nature, an enemy that may approach you on even ground, may easily pull you out; and if he be driven to seek you a hundred miles [in] the land in boats, you shall from both sides of the river where it is narrowest, so beat them with your muskets as they shall never be able to prevail against you.
Loop Drive over the Marsh

Loop Drive over the Marsh

Loop drive map

Loop drive map


Jamestown Island is ringed with slow moving water and a marsh of reeds, cypress, and pine. One of the first industries attempted at Jamestown was the extraction of pitch and tar from the pine trees in this swampy area. Pitch, tar, and the pine trees themselves were used for shipbuilding.
The most interesting thing I didn't get a picture of were the beaver lodges which were out in the swamp.

STOP 2
Marsh

Marsh


Orchard Run-- The marshy inlet to your right empties into the James River. It formed the eastern boundary of Jamestown and may have taken its name from an orchard which was planted on land adjoining the run.

We also saw the informational sign on Potash and Soap--By the 1600s, hardwood lumber was scarce in England. Early exports of the colony were potash, used in the manufacture of glass, and soap ash, which yields liquid soap.
Pitch and Tar Swamp

Pitch and Tar Swamp


To prepare potash and soap the ashes of hardwood logs were mixed with water, strained, and heated to a syrup-like consistency. The mixture could then be shipped to England. In time the colonists cleared all of the hardwood forests from Jamestown Island. Today's forest is regrowth, mostly of pine.

And the Civil War Fort-- During the American Civil War the James River provided a natural avenue of approach to the Confederate capital in Richmond. In order to deny the use of fortified in 1861. Forts, such as the one you see here, and batteries were erected at strategic points.

STOP 3
Passmore Creek-- which takes its name from Thomas Passmore, a carpenter, who lived in the vicinity. Earlier it was known as the "Marshes of Goose Hill." Goose Hill itself was the higher strip of ground on the far side of the marsh.
Harvesting Ice

Harvesting Ice


Harvesting Ice--Among the ruins of Jamestown was a seven-foot pit, dug during colonial times. In 17th century England, perishables were often stored in huts built over pits filled with layers of ice and straw. The trapped frigid air could keep meat and daily products fresh until autumn. The hole found at Jamestown was very likely a traditional English ice pit.

STOP 4
Early Medical Discoveries

Early Medical Discoveries


Medical Research-- Dr. Lawrence Bohun arrived at Jamestown in June of 1610, and stayed until the spring of 1611. He experimented with native plants, herbs, extracts, and minerals, seeking remedies for distresses of the Old World and the News.
The Golden Weed (Tobacco)

The Golden Weed (Tobacco)


STOP 5
Pottery--By 1640, Jamestown potters were making thick-walled jugs, bowls, and pots for everyday use. The local ware fired red, due to the iron-rich Tidewater clay.
Bowl, Pot and Pipe

Bowl, Pot and Pipe


Virginia's Vintage

Virginia's Vintage


Winemaking--The plentiful grape vines in the New World raised hopes of a profitable wine making industry. Native and imported varieties produced a drinkable vintage, but the wine often spoiled during shipment to England. The venture failed.

STOP 6
Trading With The Powhatan--At first, the English needed food from the natives in order to survive. The Powhatans sought the colonist's commercial goods: metal tools, glass beads, and copper. Exchanges could be forceful or friendly. The Powhatans sometimes offered corn as a gift; at other times, they refused contact, or attacked those who had come to trade. The English wrote home of successful trading, yet on occasion they stoke or raided at gunpoint.
Iron for Corn

Iron for Corn


Iron Industry

Iron Industry


Black Point-- This tip of the island is known as Black Point. It was this part of the island that was first seen by the colonists as they sailed up river in 1607. At this time you have the opportunity to leave your car and walk the trail to Black Point where you will ave a panoramic view of the James River.
The Island House

The Island House


The trail follows one of the ridges from which Jamestown Island was formed. On either side is a forest in the process of renewing itself. The ridge was once covered in hardwood, which was cleared by the English. The pine you now see is evidence of a forest in the process of regeneration.

STOP 10
Lumber--Colonists marvelled at the deep, tall forests of Virginia -- then set to clearing them away. The "goodly tall Trees" yielded firewood, fort walls, house frames, boat planks, barrel staves, industrial fuel, and lumber exports.
The Hardwood Harvest

The Hardwood Harvest

Excellent Good Timber

Excellent Good Timber


Then we went to the glasshouse,
Sign outside the glass house

Sign outside the glass house


large_n100_9321.JPG
where there was a guy who was making flasks.
Glass Blower

Glass Blower

Glassblower with red hot glass

Glassblower with red hot glass

large_n100_9330.JPG2005 - cooling glass

2005 - cooling glass


Because there were extensive forests in the New World, and England was basically deforested and had no wood available for glass furnaces,
large_n100_9316.JPG
Jamestown tried several times to manufacture glass without much success.
--In 1608, the Virginia Company of London brought several German and Polish glassblowing artisans to Jamestown, Virginia to set-up glassworks in the new colony. This first attempt was not successful.
--Later, in 1622, the Company would again attempt to manufacture glass with Italian glassblowers, but this attempt failed also
--In 1954, the ruins of the long-abandoned glass furnaces were discovered in Jamestown. Years later, an operating 17th century style glass house was reconstructed near the ruins.
glass blower's hut 1964

glass blower's hut 1964

Red ring (end) being shaped - 1964

Red ring (end) being shaped - 1964


--The original reconstruction glasshouse was destroyed by fire in 1974, and another one was built in 1976.
Glass blowing factory 2005

Glass blowing factory 2005


Today, this site has become an interpretive glassblowing facility operated by Eastern National. Modern-day artisans dressed in colonial glassblowing garb produce masterful pieces of glass, much as the colonists did almost 400 years ago. Today the glass furnace is heated by natural gas, rather than by wood as in 1608.
Glass kiln

Glass kiln


Looking into the furnace

Looking into the furnace

Glassworker with glassware on display behind him

Glassworker with glassware on display behind him


A case bottle, used for storing wine, was the most common glass vessel in the first half of the 17th century.
Case Bottle

Case Bottle


Hundreds of these bottles were found in Jamestown. The name is derived from the square sides of the bottle that allowed it to be packed into a wooden box or case for easy transport. Stands 9” high
They also manufacture more modern items (candlesticks, flasks etc),
Shelf of glassware for sale

Shelf of glassware for sale


but NONE of these items are dishwasher or microwave safe.
Counter with warning about dishwashers

Counter with warning about dishwashers

Sign about items for sale outside the glass house

Sign about items for sale outside the glass house


At "glass point" near Jamestown, the glass furnaces were re-discovered and excavated in 1948. You can see the excavations which are covered with a roof and are behind glass.
Ruins of the furnace glasshouse 'under glass'

Ruins of the furnace glasshouse 'under glass'


large_n100_9317.JPG

Posted by greatgrandmaR 16:35 Archived in USA

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Comments

How interesting! We made the mistake you refer to, of going to the Jamestown Settlement and thinking that was all there was to the place - until reading this just now! Having said that, we did like it there and thought it was very well done.

'It was difficult for me to get Bob to stop at these points' - ooh, that would really frustrate me!!

by ToonSarah

I've gotten reasonably good at getting photos from the car. A good quick camera helps. The state park is, I think, more expensive, but it is also nice.

by greatgrandmaR

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