A Travellerspoint blog

Back in Time to Old New Bern

A Law About Photos?


View Summer, 9-11-2001 - and then the 2nd time down the ICW & 2005 Migrating by Mercedes & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

March 8th
Sunrise

Sunrise


A front was supposed to be coming through. It was quite windy - the surf was amazing. I could see the spume being blown off the tops of the waves. I went out and took some pictures from the deck.
large_100_8880.JPG
Surf around the piers

Surf around the piers

Storm Waves

Storm Waves

Beach Houses

Beach Houses


The front came through with some high winds and we heard a big bang which turned out to be a big piece of shingle from the unit next to ours which landed on our patio. In other places in nearby NC planes were cart wheeled over fences and a lot of trees came down. I went out
Corridor

Corridor


and walked around the resort a little bit in the afternoon
Walkway

Walkway

Stormy day at Atlantic Beach in March

Stormy day at Atlantic Beach in March


and took photos of the pool.
Pool decks in the center of the complex

Pool decks in the center of the complex


Pool with slide (out of sight at right)

Pool with slide (out of sight at right)

Slide to pool (too cold and windy to use this in March)

Slide to pool (too cold and windy to use this in March)


Hotel from parking lot

Hotel from parking lot


We drove over to Morehead City. Before this, mostly we had just sailed by Morehead City in our boat.

Morehead City and Beaufort are the Twin Cities of North Carolina. Traditionally, Morehead City is the power boat side
70 West (power boat) Marina

70 West (power boat) Marina


and Beaufort is the sail boat side. Beaufort inlet is an all-weather inlet and Morehead City is one of two NC ports (I think the other one is Wilmington on the Cape Fear River). The city is home to several marine-research facilities such as the Institute of Marine Sciences and the North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries. It is also home to the Ferry Division of the North Carolina Department of Transportation and serves and a port of the Second Division of the US Marine Corps at Camp Lejeune. When you travel south from Morehead City on the ICW you sometimes have to stop while they conduct live ammunition exercises at Camp LeJeune. Morehead City is also near Cherry Point Air Base (also a US Marine base).

This area of North Carolina's "Crystal Coast" was the product of extensive planning by John Motley Morehead, governor of North Carolina from 1841 to 1845. He envisioned "a great commercial city" where Shepherd's Point intersected with the Newport River and Beaufort Inlet. Plans were developed to extend the North Carolina Railroad from Goldsboro to Shepherd's Point. The first lots were sold at public auction in 1857. When the railroad was completed a year later, the area seemed destined for rapid development as a major port. However, Morehead City's continued development as a port was interrupted by The Civil War. Following the war, the shipping terminal deteriorated, but the railroad continued hauling vast quantities of seafood to the state's inland sections.
Victorian House on highway

Victorian House on highway


The section of the city known as the "Promised Land," -along Bridges Street- was settled by refugees from the whaling communities on Shackleford Banks. These communities, approximately six mile east of Morehead City by boat, were utterly destroyed by the great hurricane of 1899.
Morehead City from the Car

Morehead City from the Car


In recent years, a large charter-fishing fleet has developed. The town has regained its commercial viability as a modern port terminal as well as a being the "sound-side" of the Atlantic Beach resort trade.
Water tower from the turning basin

Water tower from the turning basin


When we transit the ICW, we have to cross the turning basin of Morehead City. (Where the big ships turn around - not a place you want to be if that is happening - I've never witnessed it, but the phrase "squashed like a bug" comes to mind.)
Sign on the highway

Sign on the highway


We went out and had dinner at the Sanitary Restaurant in Morehead City This restaurant with a funny name is a down-to-earth family seafood restaurant where you can eat watching the sunset over the ICW. The name is explained on the menu and on their website as follows:
"On February 10, 1938, two partners, Tony Seamon and Ted Garner, opened a fresh seafood market on the Morehead Waterfront. A small building had been rented from Charles S. Wallace for $5.50 per week with the understanding that no beer or wine would be sold and that the premises would be kept clean and neat. The name "Sanitary Fish Market" was chosen to indicate the partners' compliance.... In the Spring of 1938 twelve stools were set up at a counter in the market, a two-burner kerosene stove was installed and the first seafood restaurant on the Morehead City waterfront was in business!"

The restaurant is now just east of the original rented building, and seating has been increased several times until it is now at 600.The room we ate in was large, and had windows all around including into the next section.
Looking out the window

Looking out the window


It was warm (which had been a concern because it was VERY cold and windy), and there were practical brown oilcloths on the table. Out in front were displays of carved duck decoys and their original cash register.
Duck Decoys

Duck Decoys


You can also buy T-shirts. They have dockage -free for lunch but $10 for overnight (regardless of the length of the boat- no electricity or water, and no feeding the seagulls).
Seagull in the window

Seagull in the window


You have to come in from the turning basin side because the other channel only has 5'.
The sun between dock pilings

The sun between dock pilings


Bob got the Senior shrimp salad for $8.95, and got a salad and baked potato with it.
Senior Shrimp Salad

Senior Shrimp Salad


I had the Seniors broiled flounder with a salad and paid $1 extra for a stuffed potato.
Seniors broiled flounder with a salad and stuffed potato

Seniors broiled flounder with a salad and stuffed potato


I also had the lemon meringe pie for $2.50.
Lemon meringe pie $2.50.

Lemon meringe pie $2.50.


Water tower at sunset from Morehead City

Water tower at sunset from Morehead City

744715701988173-Sunset_from_..ehead_City.jpgDocks beside the Sanitary Fishmarket and Restaurant

Docks beside the Sanitary Fishmarket and Restaurant


Sign at night as we left

Sign at night as we left

Morehead City from the Car

Morehead City from the Car

March 9th, 2005
We set out to go to New Bern. I thought about taking the free NC ferry across the Neuse River, but Bob said "No more ferries". We passed Havelock (the location of US Marine Corps Cherry Point Air Station)
AV8 - Marine Jump Jet

AV8 - Marine Jump Jet


The Trent River begins as a stream about 15 miles south of Kinston, NC and ends in New Bern, NC where it joins with the Neuse River at Union Point.
759546593753094-Fixed_bridge..n_New_Bern.jpgBridges

Bridges

3753098-Trent_River_drawbridge_New_Bern.jpgApproaching the Trent River drawbridge

Approaching the Trent River drawbridge


We had friends who had their sailboat in New Bern on the Trent River. Our friends' problem was that the river was too shoally to sail much, and they had to go all the way down the Neuse to get sailing room. We crossed the drawbridge over the Trent River and got to New Bern about 11
Raised houses

Raised houses


Apparently during hurricanes, the Trent floods the town, so New Bern (like Belhaven) has raised the houses near the river.
Street scene in New Bern

Street scene in New Bern

Street near town Visitor's Center

Street near town Visitor's Center


We stopped at the visitor's center. There are actually two visitors centers in New Bern. One is the Craven County Convention & Visitors Center which is located Inside the New Bern Convention Center on 203 South Front Street. This is the one we went to first. It is right down on the river. This is where I got pamphlets and maps of the town and also recommendations for lunch.
Entrance to the Convention Center

Entrance to the Convention Center


In addition to the main New Bern historic buildings like the Tryon Palace, New Bern has a full compliment of historic signs about events in New Bern. The first sign is about the Battle of New Bern, where, according to the sign, "The victory of Union General Ambrose Burnside here on March 14, 1862 caused the fall of New Bern"
Sign about the Battle of New Bern

Sign about the Battle of New Bern


The signs by the drawbridge inform us about the DILIGENCE which was one of the first ten United States Revenue Cutters which temporarily sailed out of New Bern in 1791 prior to moving to her permanent homeport of Wilmington in October of 1792.
Signs by the drawbridge

Signs by the drawbridge


The next sign is about the U.S.C.G. Cutter Pamlico which was designed to cruise in inland waters and therefore had an extremely shallow draft. The Pamlico proceeded to her permanent station at New Bern, North Carolina, arriving there on 4 November 1907 and remained there until 1947 when she was decommissioned.
Washington's Tour

Washington's Tour


New Bern has a "Washington Slept Here" signs - it states that Washington visited the Stanly home for two nights on his southern tour April 20-21, 1791. This is about the same time that the Diligence was in New Bern.
James Walker Hood  Signs

James Walker Hood Signs


The next photos are about notable New Bern citizens. Number three says: James Walker Hood ----Asst. Superintendent Public Instruction 1868-70: a founder Livingston College 1885; Bishop A.M.E. Zion Church: founded St. Peters, 1864. One blk N.
Graham A. Barden sign

Graham A. Barden sign


The last sign says: Graham A Barden (1896-1967) --- Congressman, 1935-61. Secured military bases for eastern N.C: advocated Taft Hartley labor relations act. Grave 4 blocks northwest.
Trolley Tours

Trolley Tours


We saw this little trolley when we were in New Bern, but in the winter when we were there, there was only one tour a day at 2 pm on the weekends and we couldn't make it. Plus a minimum of 6 adults are required for the tour, and there were only two of us.

Their brochure says: Discover three centuries of history and architectural beauty in a comprehensive 90-minute trolley tour of historic downtown New Bern. Our professional guides will recount the fascinating details of this former royal capital of North Carolina and will leave you enchanted by the city's unique charm.

The other VIsitor's Center is the one for the Tryon Palace Historic Sites & Gardens. And the Tryon Palace was my objective, so we drove over there.
Howard House Victorian Bed and Breakfast from the car

Howard House Victorian Bed and Breakfast from the car


But tree cutters had the road to the parking lot blocked, so we tried to go around the block and ended up in the projects.
Street to parking lot blocked near Jones house

Street to parking lot blocked near Jones house


We finally got into the parking lot by going around the block the other way, and tried to walk up to the visitor's center. The tree cutting folks turned us back and made us go through the palace gardens instead.
Bob walking OUT the palace gate with no ticket

Bob walking OUT the palace gate with no ticket

Gate and sentry box at the palace entrance

Gate and sentry box at the palace entrance


Bob thinks they cut down perfectly good trees - there was no rot showing in the trunk.
Huge tree blocking the road

Huge tree blocking the road

Jones house with visitors

Jones house with visitors


Sign about the Jones House

Sign about the Jones House


Another sign about the Jones House

Another sign about the Jones House


Everything here is on the hour and half hour. There is a 20 minute film, there are tours of the George W. Dixon and the John Wright Stanley Houses (the tour starts from the Visitor's Center - a docent takes you), and the tours of the Palace also start on the hour and half hour. We were too late to see the film - it was ending. So we bought our tickets ($15 each) and walked over to do the noon palace tour. When we went to the visitor's center they told us that no photographs were allowed in the Governor's Palace or the historic houses that we toured. I was relatively OK because they did tell us up front. And they did have postcards etc for sale.
Building beside palace

Building beside palace


Tickets Required Beyond This Point

Tickets Required Beyond This Point

Bob walking up the the Tryon Palace

Bob walking up the the Tryon Palace


Tryon Palace

Tryon Palace

Looking back at the Sentry Box

Looking back at the Sentry Box

Bob waiting for the tour

Bob waiting for the tour

Looking along the breezeway to the kitchen

Looking along the breezeway to the kitchen

Detail of the step construction

Detail of the step construction


The docent was in costume, and she explained that the Palace was built kind of like the White House - as a government building with family living quarters upstairs. It was built by the colonial Governor of NC William Tryon. He lived in it only 13 months after it was completed before he was promoted to NY. He was living in Fort George in NY when there was a fire and all of his possessions were burned. So although they have an inventory of his stuff, they don't have any of the actual stuff.
Pediment

Pediment


After the Revolution, it was used by the government for meetings and balls, but it burned down in 1798 because a servant let a candle ignite some straw in the basement. They saved the stable and the kitchen by knocking down the wooden walkways between them. Then the land was divided into lots, and people built on them. The stable was turned into apartments, but the kitchen disappeared. In the late 1940s one of the local women decided that the Palace should be rebuilt and she left money for it. So the foundations were excavated and the whole thing was rebuilt from the plans. Furniture to match as closely as possible the inventory was purchased in England. It was reopened in 1959.

When we went into the Council Chamber, we met the "governor" - a male docent dressed in costume who asked us where we were from. One of the ladies was from Seattle, and he had never heard of this place - they discussed and eventually decided that it must be a place on the western frontier. It was very well done.
Through a doorway

Through a doorway


There are many gardens in the Tryon Palace area, many of them carefully restored to something that would look familiar to th Victorians. The website had a list of flowers that would be in bloom at the time of year when you visit.
Gate to kitchen garden

Gate to kitchen garden


We saw the kitchen garden. This garden, located behind the Kitchen Office, offers a variety of produce almost year-round. Eighteenth-century varieties of vegetables, herbs, and fruit trees make the kitchen garden one of the most popular of our outdoor sites.
Gardens behind the palace from the kitchen

Gardens behind the palace from the kitchen


By the time we got finished with the Palace, it was about 12:40, so we walked over to the reconstructed kitchen
Room in the reconstructed kitchen building

Room in the reconstructed kitchen building


large_3918207-Picture_Prohibition_New_Bern.jpg Fireplace

Fireplace


Fireplace in the kitchen

Fireplace in the kitchen

Exhibit in the Old Kitchen

Exhibit in the Old Kitchen

Bedroom

Bedroom


where they had demonstrations of cooking, spinning and weaving.
Weaver

Weaver


I took a photo of a lady spinning and she told us that there was a NC State law against photographs inside historic buildings. I didn't think of it at the time, but this was NOT a historic building - it was only a reconstruction. I do not believe that she was telling me the truth. I have searched all over and can find no place that such a law is written.

When I access their website I found the following rules:
..we ask that you observe these guidelines:
--All tours begin with an informative 20-minute audio-visual orientation program. Tours are guided by costumed interpreters. Large groups are always split into smaller groups of no more than twelve.
--The furnishings of Tryon Palace and the other historic sites are several hundred years old and must be treated with great care. We ask that they not be touched by students or adults.
--Food, drinks, and gum are not allowed in the exhibition buildings. Gum should be removed before entering the Visitor Center area.
--Visitors may take photos of the gardens and building exteriors; however photography is not allowed in the exhibition buildings.
--It is recommended that visitors wear soft-soled shoes and comfortable clothes appropriate for weather conditions.

They did not make it clear to me that ALL the exhibition buildings were off limits to photography. They stated specifically the Governor's Palace and any of the single houses. And it is still not clear to me.
View from the sentry box

View from the sentry box


By this time it was 1 o'clock, and I was ready for lunch. So we walked over to Chadwick House, and ate there.
Chadwick House

Chadwick House


Lunch cafe in back of the house

Lunch cafe in back of the house


Inside the cafe

Inside the cafe


There was a real daffodil in the vase on the table. They only serve lunch from 11 to 3, Monday through Saturday.
Blackboard with specials

Blackboard with specials


They make their own chicken salad, pimiento chese, olive nut, Benedictine, beer cheese, cole slaw, potato salad, pies and cheesecake, which they sell. Bob had a roast beef sandwich for $4.75 and hot tea. I had their
Pimento Cheese sandwich ($3.50)

Pimento Cheese sandwich ($3.50)

,
lemonade, and then I had a
Coconut Chess Pie $2.25

Coconut Chess Pie $2.25

. Garden from the porch

Garden from the porch


Stairs to rooms in the back

Stairs to rooms in the back


I thought that the Chadwick House was a place to stay. Apparently it is not, but the Sail Inn next door IS.
Sail Inn

Sail Inn


When we went back to the visitor's center we saw the movie and they also have a model of the various properties.
Model of the town

Model of the town

View of the palace

View of the palace

Scene from the movie

Scene from the movie

Horse and carriage in the Visitor's Center film

Horse and carriage in the Visitor's Center film


We walked out past two of the gardens. The Stoney flower garden is located on Pollock Street. It is just beyond the Carraway Garden: the Stoney Garden is surrounded by a white picket fence.
Sign on Stoney garden

Sign on Stoney garden


It features old-fashioned perennials and antique roses of varieties known to have graced New Bern gardens in the 19th century. The garden was constructed in the late 1990s with funding provided by the family of Mary Kistler Stoney, a member of the original Tryon Palace Commission.
Mary Kistler Stoney garden

Mary Kistler Stoney garden


Unfortunately, not many flowers other than daffodils, hyacinth, pansies, violas, snowdrops and camellias were in bloom at the time of year that we were there (early March). The big wide flower beds in front of the palace had all been dug up and were just bare earth waiting for someone to plant something in them.
Gates to the palace- flower bed reconstruction

Gates to the palace- flower bed reconstruction


The other garden was the Stanly house garden. In 1967, the year after Stanly house was moved to its present location, a formal “Town Garden” of brick walks edged with boxwood was created. While the overall design suggests an 18th-century garden, plantings close to the foundation of the house were not typical of that era.
Stanly Garden

Stanly Garden


We did take a tour of the Stanly house which was built between 1779 and 1783. John Hawks, the architect who designed Tryon Palace, may have designed the Stanly House as well.
Sign out front of the house

Sign out front of the house


Built of hand-hewn longleaf pine, the Stanly House remains one of the finest examples of Georgian architect.
Photo of a house from the movie

Photo of a house from the movie


The Stanly House was moved to its current location in 1966, when the New Bern Library Association gave it to the Tryon Palace Commission. It opened to the public in 1972.
Guide on the front walk

Guide on the front walk


According to the sign out front, it was the birthplace of two men who fought on opposite sides in the Civil War. Edward Stanly was the military governor of North Carolina for the Union. Born here in 1840, he accepted the post in May 1862 in the hope that he might lead his hometown back into the Union. He was unsuccessful and resigned in March 1863.
Sign out front

Sign out front


General Lewis Addison Armistead (Stanly's nephew) was born here in 1817. He was mortally wounded during the Battle of Gettysburg during General James Longstreets attack on the Federal position atop Cemetery Ridge (Pickett's Charge).
Detail of upstairs windows

Detail of upstairs windows


After the Union army defeated the Confederates at the Battle of New Bern, the house was selected to be General Ambrose E. Burnside's headquarters. Later it served as a hospital (orginally called Stanly Hospital) and still later the Sisters of Mercy (Roman Catholic nuns who worked at the hospital) used it as a convent. The house has a great central hall.
Stanly House

Stanly House


The builder Stanly was a powerful businessman whose merchant ships raided British vessels to aid the American cause during the Revolutionary War. John Wright Stanly and his wife Ann Cogdell lived in the house only a few years before succumbing to the yellow fever epidemic of 1789. The Stanlys had nine children, the youngest of whom was only three months old at the time of his parents' death. The house remained empty until the eldest son, John Stanly, Jr., came of age and took possession in 1798.

John Stanly, Jr., a lawyer and politician, occupied the Stanly home until the mid 1820s. Early in his career, Stanly had political differences with Richard Dobbs Spaight, a former state governor. In 1802, the differences escalated into a duel, and after four rounds, Stanly mortally wounded Spaight. Dueling was illegal and Stanly was forced to leave New Bern until his friend, Judge William Gaston, could convince the governor to grant him a pardon. It was the first gubernatorial pardon ever granted in North Carolina. The house has been moved twice

We walked back to the parking lot through the stables.
Stable

Stable


(Bob thought the stalls were small - I thought the doorways were small and I wondered where they kept the carriages)
Old original stalls in the stable

Old original stalls in the stable


Stable hall

Stable hall

Palace Poultry House Garden Shop behind the stable

Palace Poultry House Garden Shop behind the stable


Origin of Pepsi-Cola
In 1893, a pharmacist named Caleb Bradham experimented with a combination of kola nuts, carbonated water, sugar, vanilla and invented "Brad's drink".
Storefront - Brad's Drink

Storefront - Brad's Drink


This drink (which was named Pepsi Cola in 1898) is one of New Bern's claims to fame. I took these pictures from the car as we passed the site of the original 'drug store' in which Caleb first concocted his drink.
Another picture of the storefront

Another picture of the storefront


Now the restored soda fountain can be visited and you can have a Pepsi there or buy a souvenier. We just passed by in the car.
Across the street

Across the street


Historic Building Walking Tour- We got a map with the historic buildings marked on it and I tried to take photos of the various buildings as we drove around town.
Entering the historic district

Entering the historic district


The Downtown Historic District is a 56 square block area,
Downtown historic district

Downtown historic district


along the banks of the Trent and Neuse Rivers, which contains a collection of buildings and landscape elements that chronicle the development of New Bern from the time when it was the capital of the new colony (1766 to 1778), to the early 20th century fueled by a thriving lumber industry - I wasn't going to walk
Court House

Court House


One of the buildings in the area is the Courthouse, The courthouse is among North Carolina's finest examples of the Second Empire style. The Craven County Courthouse was constructed in the 1880s and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Fire Tower

Fire Tower


The New Bern Fireman’s Museum is one of the oldest of its type in the country.
Fire Station

Fire Station


The Museum opened its doors in 1955; some of its artifacts date back 100 years earlier! The origins of the New Bern Fire Department began with the Atlantic Hook and Ladder Company in 1845, the first fire company chartered in North Carolina and one of the first in the nation.
Approaching the City Hall

Approaching the City Hall


The present city hall on the corner of Pollack and Craven Streets was built in 1895 and was originally a post office.
New Bern City Hall

New Bern City Hall


The clock tower was added in 1911. One of the Tryon Palace cluster of homes is the John P. Daves House.
Street scene

Street scene


John P. Daves House

John P. Daves House

Sign on Daves House

Sign on Daves House


This was built in 1813 and originally stood south of the stables facing George Street. It was moved during the restoration of Tryon Palace.
Street Corner

Street Corner


Historic Building Walking Tour

Historic Building Walking Tour

New Bern Academy sign

New Bern Academy sign


We did not get to the museum because I was more interested in driving around town. The school was incorporated by the legislature in 1766 but this is not the original building because that was destroyed by fire in 1795. This building was constructed between 1806 and 1809, and served as a school until 1971. It is claimed that it is one of the oldest continuously used school buildings in America. However, it was not used as a school continuously for all that time. During the Civil War it was commandeered as a hospital.
New Bern Academy Museum

New Bern Academy Museum


According to the website there are four permanent exhibits in the four original classrooms. The first room is an orientation room illustrating the origins of the city of New Bern and its development up to the Civil War. Across the hall, the architecture room focuses on the historic architecture of New Bern, the construction techniques used in erecting buildings in this region, and on the lives and work of New Bern's 18th- and 19th-century builders and architects.
Building as you approach from the street

Building as you approach from the street


Upstairs, the Civil War room focuses on the Confederate defense of the city, the Battle of New Bern, the Union occupation of the town, and the role that the Academy building played during the War. The exhibits include one of a hospital room to illustrate the building's use as a medical facility during the Union occupation. Across from the Civil War Room, the education room presents the history of education in New Bern from the late 18th through the 19th century including a model Lancasterian schoolroom.
Sign about the New Bern Academy

Sign about the New Bern Academy


New Bern has many historic churches. One is Christ Episcopal Church at 320 Pollock St.
Christ Church historic sign

Christ Church historic sign


The churchyard stretches to either side of the main sanctuary. In the eighteenth century it served as a burial ground.
Christ Episcopal Church

Christ Episcopal Church


In the aftermath of several yellow fever epidemics, the churchyard had filled with graves and was closed by 1799.
First Presbyterian Church

First Presbyterian Church


First Presbyterian Church is New England-like in style and rises in four steps. The cornerstone for the church was laid in 1819 and church building was dedicated in 1822.
Old Methodist Parsonage

Old Methodist Parsonage


is near the New Bern Academy. Old Methodist Parsonage

Old Methodist Parsonage


Miscellaneous photos taken while driving around town
Old store down by the waterfront

Old store down by the waterfront


Antibellum columns

Antibellum columns

Chimneys

Chimneys

4437468-Porch_detail_New_Bern.jpgPorch detail

Porch detail


368398054437408-Historic_Res..s_New_Bern.jpgStreets of New Bern

Streets of New Bern


355007554437411-Historic_Res..s_New_Bern.jpgHistoric Houses

Historic Houses


Historic, Restored and Unrestored Houses

Historic, Restored and Unrestored Houses


Unrestored porch

Unrestored porch

299247684437414-Historic_Res..s_New_Bern.jpgArchitectural Details and Interesting buildings

Architectural Details and Interesting buildings


Sudan Shriner's building

Sudan Shriner's building


March 10th - Thursday
We've had a hard time finding a restaurant to eat at. Even McDonalds turns off their lights in the evening. Amos Mosquito's where we ate Sunday was open, but not on Monday or Tuesday. Channel Marker also didn't appear to be open until Friday when we went by and is reputed to be even more expensive than Amos Mosquito's. Loughry's Landing was closed until later in March.
x100_9127.JPG
Not knowing that, we went to eat there the first night and ended up at El Zarpe, which we liked. Skipper's Cove was closed and Triple S pier also appeared closed. 4 Corners is only open for breakfast and lunch. Don't know if that is normal or if it opens for dinner in the summer.
You should have been here yesterday

You should have been here yesterday

No Pets - No Surfboards

No Pets - No Surfboards


We finally settled on the Sportsman's Pier House last night, and it was good albeit smoky. I'm not used to having so much smoke in a restaurant.
Sportsman's Pier sign

Sportsman's Pier sign

Pier rules

Pier rules


I asked the waitress whether to have the seafood au gratin or the special of the day which was spaghetti. Without hesitation she said to have the seafood au gratin. This had 5 or 6 LARGE scallops and a good number of shrimp and was very good.
Seafood Au Gratin

Seafood Au Gratin


It was $14.95 and came with cole slaw and a baked potato. Bob had a hamburger which was $5.95 for the smaller (6 oz) one.
Come Back - They'll Bite Tomorrow

Come Back - They'll Bite Tomorrow


March 11th - Friday.

It is supposed to rain tomorrow. There is more surf outside the unit.
More surf

More surf


The trash truck came and then they mowed the "lawn" (which is dead brown grass and doesn't need mowing), and then they came with a blower, but everything available to be blown away has been already blown away.

I called down and asked them about checkout procedures and they said to strip the beds which no-one else has asked us to do. I finally found the phone book and information which was in a drawer under the TV. Bob moved about half our stuff down into the car because it is supposed to rain tomorrow.
Sunset

Sunset


We went to eat over the bridge in Morehead City - we went out looking for Charlie's, and could not find it. We saw AJ's but we ended up eating at a chain called Texas Steakhouse.
Outside of Texas Steakhouse at night

Outside of Texas Steakhouse at night

Alligator and flags

Alligator and flags

Stuffed heads on the walls

Stuffed heads on the walls

Inside decor

Inside decor


It was reasonable - I had a half rack of ribs and Bob had a sirloin steak. It was $31.50 including tip.

March 12th - Saturday

We are heading back up to Fort Story today.
Last look out the window

Last look out the window


Packed up and checked out - drove out through Beaufort and up to Havelock where I got a photo of the sign
Cherry Point --- US Marine Corps Air Station activated 1941 as Cunningham Field for the first USMC abiator A.A. Cunningham.

Cherry Point --- US Marine Corps Air Station activated 1941 as Cunningham Field for the first USMC abiator A.A. Cunningham.

Base Gate

Base Gate


and then up to New Bern and picked up US 17. We got to Edenton about noon. We stopped at the Waterman's Grill for lunch.
Waterman's Grill

Waterman's Grill

Specials board

Specials board

Bar at the Waterman's Grill - Edenton

Bar at the Waterman's Grill - Edenton

5065666-raw_bar_menu_Edenton.jpgRaw bar menu and bar

Raw bar menu and bar

5065664-Coming_from_the_bathrooms_Edenton.jpgPrice board for wine and beer

Price board for wine and beer

Photo on the wall of Waterman's Grill

Photo on the wall of Waterman's Grill

My picture of myself in the ladies room

My picture of myself in the ladies room


We both had grilled ham and cheese with a cup of soup (one of the specials) for $4.95.
5065572-Open_Sunday_night_Edenton.jpg
I had the corn crab chowder. Then we both had pineapple upside down cake for dessert ($3.25).
Pineapple upside down cake

Pineapple upside down cake


Bob said it would have been better with whole pineapple rather than crushed and that they skimped on the brown sugar, but it was good.
Waterman's Grill

Waterman's Grill


Then I took a couple of photos of Edenton on the way out
Cupola House from the street

Cupola House from the street

5065633-Leary_Building_Edenton.jpgLeary Building

Leary Building

Flag with 13 stars

Flag with 13 stars

large_5065655-Historic_Edenton_Edenton.jpg5065653-Historic_Edenton_Edenton.jpgSt. Paul's Churchyard

St. Paul's Churchyard


We went through South Mills
South Mills drawbridge

South Mills drawbridge


and up 17 and out to Virginia Beach. We drove past Mt. Trashmore and the length of Atlantic Blvd, and checked in about a hour early.
Bob walking in to the Lodge

Bob walking in to the Lodge


Fort Story is out on the beach opposite the end of the cape of the Virginia Eastern Shore. We can see out to where all the tankers and container ships anchor waiting for pilots or tugs.
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We are on the third floor, with a room numbered in the 200s. But there was an elevator. It was a handicapped room, and had a big shower with a stool, and enormous bathroom, and a mini-fridge, two burner stove and sink. There was also a coffee pot and toaster, plus eating utensils and plates, and some pots and pans.

A little later we went out and had dinner at Guadalajara. The food was good and the service was quick, but I thought the waiter was a bit pushy about trying to tell me what I would want to eat.
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Bob had three tacos (a la carte because their tacos were so fancy he was afraid to order them) and I had a Mexican pizza which was almost too much for me to eat. They took off the guacamole, which I find too spicy. Then I had fried ice cream which had apparently been rolled in corn flakes.
fried ice cream

fried ice cream


The total including tax and tip was $21.84.

Posted by greatgrandmaR 11:19 Archived in USA

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Comments

I like the look of that swimming pool. Did not know there was such a thing as fried ice-cream.

by irenevt

Fried ice cream is a standard dessert at Mexican restaurants in the US. It usually isn't actually fried - it is just kind of breaded with cereal or something like that and served in a tortilla shell

by greatgrandmaR

I do love a storm on the coast! We passed through New Bern and went to the soda fountain but didn't have enough time to see everything there - it looks very interesting :)

by ToonSarah

I do wish I'd gone to the soda fountain - I liked Pepsi better than Coke.

by greatgrandmaR

I don't like either but I found the soda fountain very photogenic!

by ToonSarah

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