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Back to Beaufort (NC)

Exploring the Crystal Coast


View Summer, 9-11-2001 - and then the 2nd time down the ICW & 2005 Migrating by Mercedes & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

So far on this trip we have seen six of the seven main coastal lighthouses in North Carolina - at least from a distance. From north to south the ones we have seen
- Currituck
- Bodie Island
- Hatteras
- Ocracoke
- Oak Island (only from a distance)
- Bald Head (from a distance this year although we saw it close up in 2001)

We also saw
-Roanoke Marshes
-Prices Creek

But just as we have not seen Cape Romain in South Carolina, so far we have not seen Cape Lookout in North Carolina. Today we mean to remedy that omission.

7 March 2005

Today Bob got up at the regular time and made himself breakfast. I got up and did email and then had a late breakfast.

Then, we went across the causeway to Morehead City and past the Sanitary Restaurant,
Bridge to Beaufort

Bridge to Beaufort


through Beaufort
Beaufort Town Hall and Visitor's Center

Beaufort Town Hall and Visitor's Center

North Carolina Banker's Association

North Carolina Banker's Association


and out US 70 to the Harker's Island turnoff.
Road to Harker's Island

Road to Harker's Island


Fort Hancock sign

Fort Hancock sign

Cape Lookout Lighthouse sign

Cape Lookout Lighthouse sign


When we get to the end of Harker's Island, we looked for the Cape Lookout Lighthouse Visitor's Center
Visitor's center

Visitor's center


where I was able to get a stamp in my passport.
Sign and clock in the visitor's center

Sign and clock in the visitor's center


We looked through the scope at the lighthouse
Photo through the scope

Photo through the scope


and saw a video tape about the seashore.
Video about the seashore and lighthouse

Video about the seashore and lighthouse

Cape Lookout Light from Harkers Island

Cape Lookout Light from Harkers Island

Lighthouse from the visitor's center

Lighthouse from the visitor's center


The Cape Lookout Lighthouse has a diamond pattern on it to distinguish it from Hatteras and Bodie Island. They call this area "The Crystal Coast". Diamond City, a community that once stood on the eastern end of Shackleford Banks, was named after the daymark pattern on the nearby Cape Lookout Lighthouse. The Cape Lookout Light is one of the very few lighthouses that operate during the day. The Cape Lookout Lighthouse is the only such structure in the United States to bear the checkered daymark, intended not only for differentiation between similar light towers, but also to show direction. The center of the black diamonds points in a north-south direction, while the center of the white diamonds points east-west. I originally thought that this was the Diamond Coast, but Diamond Shoals are the shoals that are protected by Cape Hatteras Lighthouse.
Map of Seashore at Visitor's Center

Map of Seashore at Visitor's Center


The Cape Lookout seashore is composed of several islands - one of them (Shacklefort Banks) has feral horses, and one of them has Portsmouth on the south side of Ocracoke Inlet. Formerly Portsmouth was in the lightering business - big ships unloaded their wares and lightered them in to town. It is a ghost town because when Hatteras Inlet was opened by a hurricane, all the ship traffic went there. It has been and is being restored by the park service. There are wild horses on this section of the barrier islands just as there are in Assateague, Currituck and Ocracoke to the north and Cumberland Island to the south.
How Many Horses?

How Many Horses?

Harems and Bands

Harems and Bands

Roundups and Removal

Roundups and Removal

Pregnancy, Gestation, and Birth Control

Pregnancy, Gestation, and Birth Control

2002 and 2003 on Shackelford Banks

2002 and 2003 on Shackelford Banks


You can't get out there except by boat, and this time of year the boats don't run much.
Ferry schedule in the Visitor's Center

Ferry schedule in the Visitor's Center


Looking out from inside the visitor's center

Looking out from inside the visitor's center


Also it is very windy. I take some photos of a kite surfer practicing just off the island.
Jumpoff Point for Cape Lookout

Jumpoff Point for Cape Lookout


Kite boarder and lighthouse

Kite boarder and lighthouse

Kite boarder

Kite boarder


We went into the parking lot of the Core Sound Waterfowl Museum Store & Gallery which was next door and which said it was open, but the parking lot was deserted, so we didn't go in.
Museum sign

Museum sign


Museum

Museum

Another view

Another view


I had thought we might have lunch out and then have dinner in, but neither of us was very hungry.
Too early for lunch

Too early for lunch

Calico Jacks - on the way back to Beaufort

Calico Jacks - on the way back to Beaufort


So we drove back towards Beaufort.
Smoker's Choice

Smoker's Choice


Beaufort is a seaport town from way back. In 1722, Beaufort became both the port of entry and the courthouse town for Carteret precinct.
· Farnifold Green was the first to obtain the patent for the land now known as Beaufort
· Beaufort was named after Henry Somerset, Duke of Beaufort , an English Lord
· Street names that have been the same since 1713.
--- Turner St. - Robert Turner, an earlier proprietor of Beaufort
--- Moore St. - Col. James Moore who was responsible for bringing an end to the Tuscarora War.
--- Pollock St. - Thomas Pollock, acting governor of the colony of NC from 1712-1714
--- Queen St. and Ann St. - Named after Queen Ann the reigning monarch at the time.
Ann Street looking down towards Old Burial Ground

Ann Street looking down towards Old Burial Ground


--- Orange St. - William III of Orange who had reigned in England before Ann.
--- Craven St. - William Lord Craven, another English Lord
· Early names for Beaufort were “Hungry Town”, “Fish Town” and the Corree Indian name of “Cwariok”
· Mail from Raleigh took 2-3 weeks to arrive, while mail to NYC or Boston would take no more than 3 days, making communication with major trade ports much better than with the capitol of the state.
· In 1770, a cedar post was erected at the corner of Front St. and Pollock St. to discern between “Old Town” and “New Town”
· Spanish pirates attacked and pillaged the town twice during the summer in 1747, until driven off by local farmers and the militia. One of the Spanish pirate, during the invasion of 1747, was cornered and caught in the attic of The Hammock House, where he was killed on the spot.
· The attacks by the Spanish in 1747 prompted the construction of Fort Dobbs in 1755 (Named after NC Governor Arthur Dobbs) on Bogue Island, followed by Fort Hampton, two miles southwest of Beaufort.
· For many years, “The Pirate Invasion” was re-enacted every year on the last Saturday in June on the Beaufort Waterfront.

For hundreds of years, Beaufort could only be reached by boat. Roads in early Beaufort were made of oyster shells and as I know from experience oyster shells really cut up your tires. So it is good that the roads are now paved just like most US and even NC roads.

I have only been to Beaufort NC once by water, and we just anchored and didn't get off the boat. When we were traveling by boat since then, we've always bypassed it because we heard it was very expensive. This was the information I had

Town Creek: There is a shoal to be avoided on the red side (south) all the way in to the anchorage, but there is plenty of room between the three black and white markers (A, B, and C) for anchoring, although there are permanent moorings there which you have to avoid. There is excellent shelter from all winds. Town Creek is in back of Beaufort.

The town faces Taylor Creek Anchoring in Taylor Creek will be more difficult as there are many more boats and there are strong currents and it is exposed to wind and wake. Two anchors are recommended [Bob does not want to use two anchors] Swing Room: sufficient room for vessels as large as 48 feet - BUT so many people anchor here that there is really no room to anchor and the alternative docks at the city marina are quite expensive.

Flashback to 13 November 2000

The engine hour meter stopped working yesterday and isn't working today either. Also the oil pressure and temperature are not right. Bob starts taking things apart and gets down in the engine compartment twice. Eventually he finds the loose or broken wire that isn't making a good connection and everything is fixed. Later we heard a really big racket - a throbbing noise. Bob has been into the engine room and thought he fixed the engine electrical stuff which runs the gauges -- what is this racket?? Is the engine coming apart?
Amphibious vehicle

Amphibious vehicle


We look around and it is a BIG amphibious vehicle with big spinning tires that is making the noise - it passes going north.

We pick up the range in Core Creek, and TERRAPIN STATION and LUMBER I pass us again. As we are going down towards Beaufort, I suddenly look up and find that Bob is going to go the wrong way. We quickly alter course, and go down into Town Creek in back of Beaufort. The more popular (and larger) anchorage is Taylor Creek right on the waterfront, but I've decided that the less popular anchorage is better. SANTA MARIA is already here along with a couple of moored boats, and a live bait shack (abandoned).
Chart where we anchored across from marina

Chart where we anchored across from marina


We anchor exactly in the middle of an anchorage between black and white markers A, B, and C (marked BW on the chart) which form a triangle at about 1:30 after 23.9 miles at 5.8 mph and a total trip of 306 nautical miles. The folks from SANTA MARIA tell us to be aware that the boat next to them (with a bicycle on the deck) has a somewhat scruffy man living aboard. After we anchor, JOY B comes in and anchors behind us and GEMINI anchors in front of us. A new looking big boat with (apparently) a single man aboard anchors off to one side. Maybe he is a delivery skipper.
Town Creek Anchorage from the bridge 2005

Town Creek Anchorage from the bridge 2005


The guy from JOY B rowed over after he got in to thank us for asking the bridge tender to hold the bridge for him. We can neither one of us remember which bridge it was, but I do remember vaguely doing it. He apparently anchored on the front side of Oriental last night because he had a bad experience with the marina that we were in last night.

He says his dog (a piebald mutt) has no difficulty doing his business on the foredeck, and doesn't have to be taken ashore like Dreyfus of SANTA MARIA.

We are in the habit of eating dinner while watching the sunset and then going to bed. We also listen to "All Things Considered" and "Fresh Air" on NPR (National Public Radio) each night - we can get it most places on the FM radio, and we get better local weather than most other radio stations, plus we don't have to listen to music that one or the other or both of us don't like. In a marina, we watch the TV of course. We still don't know who won the election, but we don't really care anymore.

14 November 2000
When we woke up this morning all the boats were rearranged in the anchorage. The moored boat that we were in front of is now in front of us. GEMINI that was in front of us is behind us. JOY B that was behind us on the port side is now beside us on the port, and SANTA MARIA that was beside us on the port is now on the starboard, and not pointed the same direction as we are.

GEMINI leaves early before 7. I think they went back to the split in the channel and went down the other side under the fixed bridge. I call the Gallant's Channel bascule bridge which is right next to the anchorage to find out when the next opening is. He says he will open at 7:20, and opens at 20 past the hour, 40 past the hour and on the hour, except he doesn't open at 7:40. So we hastily pull our clothes on and pull the anchor and go through the 7:20 draw.

Bob had some trouble with the wash down pump (which is a cheap Ruhl bilge pump that he plugs into a 12V plug in the Vberth and puts over the side into the water and pumps water up out of the creek or whatever body of water we are anchored in to wash off the anchor chain and anchor), so he didn't get the anchor actually washed off.
Chart of the anchorage in Taylor Creek

Chart of the anchorage in Taylor Creek


Come down past Taylor Creek and there *are* a lot of boats anchored there.
Anchorage from the ICW

Anchorage from the ICW


Then go south toward the Atlantic past Bird Island. There are lots and lots of pelicans there. It smells like heather. We have breakfast in the cockpit while motoring.

As we turn back up into the Morehead Channel, the tide is coming in and the current has us up to 8 mph. We pass mile 215 at 9:03 and are into Bogue Sound by 9: 11. Bob goes to see what is wrong with the wash down pump and finds that the plug had a short which caused it to blow a fuse. So he fixed that. We pass the 220 mile marker at 9:51.


End Flashback

Bob suggested that we go down to the waterfront.
Taylor Creek 2005

Taylor Creek 2005


As we were driving along Front Street, he saw a CSY 33 at a private dock. I went down as far as I could and took pictures.
CSY at a private dock

CSY at a private dock


They had a wooden trailboard on the bow with the name, but it was in the shadow and I couldn't read it.
Trailboards

Trailboards


A private dock

A private dock


Bob suggested that I walk over from farther down the street and see if the name was on the stern.
SURPRISE

SURPRISE


It was - it was SURPRISE.
Front Street

Front Street


Then we went to the NC Maritime Museum. This has been hyped as a big deal. And it is very nice, but it isn't as good IMHO as the one at Solomons, although this one is free. They had a big shell collection
Part of shell collection

Part of shell collection


(but the one in Bermuda is MUCH more complete), and a lot of objects arranged in a quiz (like a bottle wrapped in cords,
Quiz board

Quiz board

Quiz board

Quiz board

large_100_8802.JPG
and a little Seagull motor)
Seagull motor

Seagull motor


First outboards

First outboards


and a lot of stuffed fish.
Fishing Exhibit

Fishing Exhibit

Sea Animals

Sea Animals

Diorama

Diorama


There were more different kinds of boats and explanations about the various styles of boats than there are in Solomons.
Types of boats

Types of boats


Faking box

Faking box


There was a small section on Blackbeard,
Display on Blackbeard

Display on Blackbeard


and one on duck decoys including one that flapped its wings.
Duck decoys

Duck decoys

Gift Shop

Gift Shop


Some volunteers were there with fossils that they had found locally - a lot of sharks teeth. They handed me a big chunk of fossil and asked me what it was, and I said it looked like a grinding tooth. They were impressed, because it was a mammoth tooth. After we left, we walked through the back garden
Maze in the back yard of the John C. Manson House

Maze in the back yard of the John C. Manson House


to the Beaufort Historic Site.
Safrit Historical Center where all the tours start

Safrit Historical Center where all the tours start

Closeup of the front of the Gift Shop

Closeup of the front of the Gift Shop


Historical society display

Historical society display


The Beaufort Historical Society has walking tours that you can take (Monday to Saturday 10, 11:30, 1 and 3 tickets $6 adults $4 children) through various restored dwellings, and there is a double decker bus tour April through October (not running when we were there in March) which again is $6 for adults. There are also various books you can buy (more money). If you don't want to pay to find out about the various historic homes and buildings, they do have a one page map and they gave me a copy.
Walking tour map

Walking tour map


I am a connoisseur of historical tour maps. This one is seriously deficient in two ways.
1) They don't have the addresses of any of the buildings, so you can't really tell where they are or whether you have found them. I was not able to identify the Duncan House until I found an antique post card of it. It wouldn't cost anything to put the addresses in there. Even if I could read the house number and knew what street it was on, it did me no good because the map did not have addresses. The other problem is that the names of the houses are written in script and the signs on the house are also written in script and the script is impossible to read.
Plaque which can't be read

Plaque which can't be read


2) While there is a key which says what building is at each of the locations on the map, there are no pictures or even a sketch drawing of the various buildings.

For the American Revolution, Beaufort provided men, leadership and supplies to the colonial army. Near the end of the war, the Royal Governor Thomas Burke sent a force of 250 men and four vessels to Beaufort to “plunder and destroy the Town of Beaufort”. The schoolhouse was burned down after a fight between the enemy and the town force. But there are still many historic buildings remaining. The first architectural survey was conducted in Beaufort in the early 1970s and was the basis for the Beaufort Historic District National Register nomination of 1974. Since then, the Historic Preservation Office has sponsored three additional survey projects in the county, including a an update of the original Beaufort Historic District survey in 1996. 1772 Gibbs House was the first building listed 14 March 1973. This house was the home of Captain Charles Biddle and his bride Hannah Shepard during the Revolutionary war.

The Old Burying Ground was listed in 1974. The Old Burying Ground grew up around the building used for sessions of the Court and for reading the service of the Anglican Church in St. John's Parish. The earliest graves which are in the northwest corner would have been marked by cedar slabs or shells due to lack of indigenous stone. (And since there was no access to Beaufort except by boat, bringing grave stones in would probably not have been high priority.) These are vaulted graves bricked over to protect them from water and wild animals.

Some of the people buried here are:
1 Capt. Josiah Pender. Seized Ft. Macon before NC seceded from the Union in1861.
3 Josiah Davis, MD. Practiced medicine in the Apothecary Shop now in the Historic Site
4 Vienna Dill. The child died of yellow fever and was buried in a glass top case
5 Samuel Leffers. Schoolmaster who owned the Leffer's house on the Site.
6 Pierre Henry. An African American who taught emancipated slaves at the Washburn Academy.
7 Rev. Arendell. One of 6 of the Ann St. Methodist Ch. ministers buried here.
8 Josiah Bell. Lived on Turner Street in the yellow house that is now part of the Historic Grounds
9 Nathan Fouller. Believed to be a direct descendant of the Mayflower pilgrims. Died 1800.
10 Capt. John Sabiston. Died near Charleston and was brought home by his crew.
14 Sgt. George Johnson. A member of the U.S. Colored Infantry who fought in the Civil War.
15 Sarah Gibbs and Jacob Shepard. He was lost at sea and she remarried. He returned, they agreed that she stay with her 2nd husband but be buried with her 1st.
18 Col. William Tohmson. The highest ranking officer from Beaufort who served in the Revolutionary War.
19 British Officer. Died on ship in Beaufort harbor. He was buried standing up "in rebel's ground".
20 "Crissie Wright" Common Grave. The sailors who froze to death in the shipwreck are buried here.
27 Capt James Manney. Joined the secessionist militia takeover of Ft. Macon in 1861. Eventually fought with Lee's army at Petersburg. Va.
Historic sign outside the Old Burying Ground

Historic sign outside the Old Burying Ground


The sign says:
C (insignia)
43 OLD BURYING GROUND
_______________
Deeded to town, 1731, by Captain Otway Burns of the War of 1812, Revolutionary and Civil War soldiers are buried here.In case you wanted to know Otway Burns (c.1775–1850) was an American privateer, b. Onslow co., N.C. At the outbreak of the War of 1812, he outfitted the Baltimore clipper Snap-Dragon as a privateer and began one of the most spectacular privateering careers in American history. He destroyed and captured millions of dollars worth of British shipping and had a $50,000 price set on his head by the British. After the war Burns turned to shipbuilding and later served (1821–35) in the North Carolina legislature. A captured cannon is on his grave.The Beaufort Historical Association gives tours June to Spet on Tues, Weds, Thurs at 2:30 pm $5 adults $3 children. Self guided brochurers available.

2089320-Unidentified_Historic_Houses_Beaufort.jpgDetails of unidentified historic house

Details of unidentified historic house


The whole Beaufort Historic District was put onto the register just a little later in 1974
Beaufort Historic District ***(Carteret County -#74001331) (9000 acres, 16 buildings)
Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering
Architect, builder, or engineer: Simpson,Herbert Woodley
Architectural Style: Greek Revival, Queen Anne, Gothic
RevivalArea of Significance: Community Planning And Development, Commerce, Military, Transportation, Science, Architecture
Period of Significance: 1700-1924
Owner: Private The last one listed was the Jacob Henry House in 5/7/1977
Beaufort Street with historic homes

Beaufort Street with historic homes


Directions: Roughly bounded by Beaufort Channel, Pine and Fulford Sts., and Taylors Creek, Beaufort Street
Unidentified Historic House

Unidentified Historic House


Historic District Homes - The important houses in the historic district are labeled like the ones in this photo. There is a map which shows the various properties, numbered for a walking tour. But although we drove around and I took pictures of everything that wasn't moving, I did not get pictures of (or could not identify):
1709 Hammock House - Oldest house in Beaufort.
1764 Langdon House - built by Rich Barker.
1771 Morse House - cannon ball found here
1772 Gibbes House
1774 Allen Davis House - General Burnside's headquarters
1778 Rumley House originally used wooden pegs instead of nails
1778 Leffer's Cottage is a good example of a 'story and a jump' or one and a half story house.
1779 Bears House (steamboat gothic style house said to have been sold for a cow and a calf)
1820 Purvis Chapel - the oldest Beaufort church in continuous use
1825 Josiah Bell House
1827 Hatsell House
1831 Odd Fellows Lodge - built by the same brick masons who were working on Fort Macon
1837 Joel Henry Davis house was used as a dorm for boys from more rural areas.
1839 John Hill House - Originally build on Portsmouth Island
1840 Rev. Jones House - first house in Beaufort to have a phone but Mrs. Jones was so fearful that she had it installed on a post in the yard.
1854 Carteret Academy - three story house with classrooms on the first floor
1857 Leecraft House -Union Provost Marshalls headquarters. Axe marks made by soldiers still visible
1857 - St. Paul's Episopal Church - built by local shipbuilders.
1907 Carteret County Courthouse - statue of Confederate soldier faces south
Unidentified historic house

Unidentified historic house

The photos that I could identify are listed in approximately the order that they were built.
Richard Rustell House 1732 (Mattie King Davis Art Gallery)

Richard Rustell House 1732 (Mattie King Davis Art Gallery)


This is a frame dwelling with a tin roof. The exterior has been restored.· Richard Rustull, along with John Shackleford, John Nelson, Joseph Bell, and Christopher Gale were a group of town fathers who were the first Commissioners and among the vestrymen of St. John’s Parish in 1723. The Mattie King Davis Art Gallery is in Rustell House on the grounds of the Beaufort Historic Site and is Carteret County's oldest art gallery.

Jacob Henry House

Jacob Henry House


The Jacob Henry House is the largest and most ambitious Federal house in Beaufort, distinguished by its dramatic roof line. Its chief significance derives from its connection with Jacob Henry; the 1809 debate over his right as a Jew to hold state office. The large house at 229 Front Street has been identified as the home of John Easton, a prominent political and military figure in the seaport town of Beaufort during the period of the Revolution, but he didn't build it. .
William Bordon House c 1768 (Cedars by the Sea)

William Bordon House c 1768 (Cedars by the Sea)


I have not stayed here.This house was originally the home of William Bordon, a Quaker. Since he was a Quaker he could not swear an oath. Therefore he could not hold public office although he was an important person in the town.

Sloo House 1768

Sloo House 1768


This Federal style house on Front Street was built around 1768 as the home of a ship captain. The sea captain's daughter died at sea. Her body was preserved in a keg of rum. She is now buried in the Old Burying Ground
Ward House 1785

Ward House 1785


Piver House c 1786

Piver House c 1786


This fisherman's cottage was once used as a school for girls from the Outer Banks. It includes the tall half-story locally called a story-and-a-jumpt is now a is beautifully restored with wonderful old floors, 2 fireplaces, screened porch, downstairs master bedroom with private patio.

Sasson (?) House 1796

Sasson (?) House 1796


This is another house that I can't find out anything about. I think it is near the Piver House on Orange Street

Dr. James Manney House 1812

Dr. James Manney House 1812


Mary Warshaw corrected my spelling - I thought it was the James Mining House [and I STILL think that it is inappropriate to have signs that people can't read even if they do look real pretty] and says, "Lots of history here. Dr. Manney provided some of the brick for the building of Fort Macon."

1820 Fulcher House 70 Front Street

1820 Fulcher House 70 Front Street


The sign on the house says it is the Fulcher House, so I am sure that is what it is. I thought it was the same as the Belcher-Fulcher House, but Mary Warshaw thinks it is probably the Fulcher House in the first block of Front Street instead.

1825 John C. Manson house

1825 John C. Manson house


The John C. Manson House which is across the street from the Historical Center building was built in the Bahamian style is on the original site. The exterior door has an historic decorative faux finish. Inside it is also authentically restored.

Carteret County Jail c 1829 and Apothecary Shop 1859

Carteret County Jail c 1829 and Apothecary Shop 1859


The first jail in town was built by Daniel Reese on lot 7 in “Old Town”, which is where Queen St. is today. The jail can be seen at the Beaufort Historic Grounds. The Carteret County Jail from about 1829 is supposed to be architecturally perfect. It contains two cells and jail keeper's quarters. The facility was used as a jail until 1954. It is on the left half out of the picture, because I was actually taking a picture of the Apothecary Shop and Doctor's Office. The Doctor's Office is a restored building containing appropriate furnishings and many original articles and examples of instruments, bottles, and prescriptions used in early country medicine.

Fuller House c 1831

Fuller House c 1831


The offices of the Beaufort Historical Association are located in the Fuller House
Buckman House  c 1845

Buckman House c 1845


I have edited out the parking sign from the middle of the picture.This house is still in the Buckman family. It has an above ground basement, which is unusual for this area.

Steeple of Ann Street Methodist Church 1854

Steeple of Ann Street Methodist Church 1854


This shows the steeple of the church which is next to the Old Burying Ground. Inside, hand carved woodwork adorns the walls and ceiling, and there are stained glass windows that date back to 1898.

Dr. Josiah Davis's house c 1854

Dr. Josiah Davis's house c 1854


Dr Davis had an apothecary and medical office building next to the house, but they have been moved next to the Beaufort Historic Site for Tours

Photo from the street of Sabiston House 1857

Photo from the street of Sabiston House 1857


The ELIZABETH INN was built in 1857, by Captain John Sabiston who called it Sabiston House. In 1947, Dr. and Mrs. Woodard purchased this historical home and raised five boys here. Mrs. Woodard resided in the house until her death in April of 1994. The Inn is listed in the book "Haunted Inns of the Southeast".

Detail of Gabriel House c 1880

Detail of Gabriel House c 1880


I can find no information about this house except for a painting by Mary Warshaw which is of almost exactly this view. Her note indicates that the house was built about 1880. She says "..all I know is that it was handed down by virtue of "lifetime rights."
G. W. Richardson House 1896

G. W. Richardson House 1896


Duncan Hall built in 1900

Duncan Hall built in 1900


It is hard to believe, but the Beaufort Historical Society map notes that this house was moved from the corner lot by mules, and the invalid owner didn't realize what was taking place until he saw the scenery outside his window changing. It certainly looks settled now. I was only able to identify it because I found an antique postcard of it, because the Historical Society map eschews the use of any kind of street address.

Clawson's 1905 Restaurant and Pub from the car

Clawson's 1905 Restaurant and Pub from the car


Clawson's is housed in the middle of the downtown in what was Clawson's General Store back in the early 1900s. According to the Crystal Coast Review, you can step up for a cup of joe at the Fishtowne Java coffee bar; shop the general store shelves for a T-shirt or other Clawson's-branded merchandise; proceed to the living room and catch up with the world according to CNN; move on to the rear for the best beer selection in town; or be seated upstairs or down for lunch or dinner.
Bag Lady Store Front

Bag Lady Store Front


Easton House

Easton House


According to Mary Warshaw, this house which is at 215 Front Street is the Morse House. It demonstrates a typical Beaufort gable “hip” roof which is the Greek Revival period architecture’s distinguishing characteristic. The roof maintains a steep pitch at the ridge but then breaks to cover porches in front and bays in the rear at lesser pitches. Typical roofs of this style have at least three planes, but many houses have four. The Easton House (219 Front) has five of the gable 'hip' planes
Beaufort Inn

Beaufort Inn


Their website says: The Beaufort Inn is a first class facility with 44 well appointed rooms, an intimate dining room, meeting facilities, an exercise room and a large outdoor hot tub spa. They are right by Town Creek.
Looking out over the Creek

Looking out over the Creek

Looking across to marina

Looking across to marina

Land side of Town Creek and Beaufort bridge

Land side of Town Creek and Beaufort bridge


805 Front Street Single Family House built 1907

805 Front Street Single Family House built 1907


Variable height picket fence

Variable height picket fence


Beaufort has several private residences that are over 200 years old, and at least 100 buildings that are more than a century old. Unfortunately, there is no comprehensive map of these homes, so I do not know which one of them is in this picture. Early homes were built with boat building skills and tools, and the houses look a bit like the double porch styles of the Bahamas and West Indies. Almost all the homes from simple cottages to Greek Revival styles have porches. The Beaufort Historical Society literature also indicates that these wavy fences are unique to Beaufort, and tries to make a link between that and an old law stating that pigs had to be kept in the yard. Any pig found in the street could be slaughtered by the finder, although they had to give half to the church to feed the hungry. Personally though, I can't see why a wavy fence would be better to keep pigs in. Plus I know that this style of fence is also found in Oxford MD and other places
207 Front Street Single family home built in 1922

207 Front Street Single family home built in 1922


Historic House on Front Street

Historic House on Front Street


The Coast Guard calls the water under this bridge as the Beaufort Channel. I know it as the Gallant Channel bridge.
Grayden Paul Drawbridge (car for the bridge tender on the right

Grayden Paul Drawbridge (car for the bridge tender on the right


In April of 2001, the Coast Guard wrote: "The Graydon Paul Bridge is the connecting bridge between Beaufort and Morehead City, North Carolina on US 70. This is the only corridor into Beaufort without making a 3 hour commute around Carteret County. Eleven to twelve thousand vehicles pass over the bridge everyday. One mile south of the Greydon Paul Bridge on US 70 is the Morehead City US 70 Bridge, which is a fixed 65 ft vertical clearance bridge over the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AICWW). It is a short waterway commute for boaters to go around through the AICWW by Morehead City back to Beaufort. Motorists do not have an alternate route traveling to and from Beaufort to Morehead City. When bridge lifts occur, traffic backsup periodically for six to seven miles. This was the rational for restricted bridge openings. They added that for vessels it added 35-40 minutes in transit time to vessels to go around. I think that is a somewhat short estimate - I'm pretty sure it would take us longer than that to go from Town Creek back out the channel and down the ICW.

Tonight, I ate my leftover ribs, and Bob went out and got hamburgers from McDonalds. He also got me apples to dip into caramel sauce for dessert.

Posted by greatgrandmaR 11:02 Archived in USA

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I did the historical walking tour when we visited Beaufort and found it very interesting as far as I remember. Chris, who is less interested in history, opted out and went to a bar to wait for me!

by ToonSarah

The walking tour was not at a convenient time - I would have done the trolley tour, but they didn't do it in the winter.

by greatgrandmaR

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